> posted by   on July 7th 2014
 

Milan 2014: Polish Job

Polish design is already an established name on the European design map. It is very young and experimental, but Polish designers are strongly on the rise. It is a perfect moment for Central Europe to show their independence, to break the stereotypes of “being an Eastern European block” (if somebody still thinks like this, they should update their education). Poland is taking a completely different course in design development. After almost 50 years of being a manufacturing country (for Germany, Sweden, etc), Polish companies have now discovered the power of the brand. It is also a moment of growing SMEs starting their R&D with full design management processes and government and semi-government institutions closely working with experts from social and service design. Polish design has gone through a very artistic approach that unfortunately remained a concept and has never been implemented in manufacturing. Designers were forced to produce their projects on a very small scale, which made design very exclusive or overly crafted with a touch of folklore.

Today SMEs as well as designers are slowly finding each others. In the largest Polish cities you can find very professional design centres. Just to mention a few: Concordia Design in Poznan, Zamek Cieszyn, Lodz Design Centre and Design Centre Gdynia. Each centre has its own financial funding and different legal status, but all of them run very successful projects (commercial and EU), organise business trainings, facilitate meetings, set up conferences and curate their own expositions. Polish design is booming.

This year’s Polish design exposition was fully supported by IAM (Instytut of Adam Mickiewicz) and presented at the central location of Ventura Lambrate – the best off-side district during the Milan Design Week.

The exposition was titled “Polish Job “and was curated by Magda Kochanowska and produced together with Lodz Design Centre.

“The Polish Job exhibition aimed at acquainting the international public with contemporary Polish design, seen through the scope of three interconnected categories: locality, nostalgia and innovation. These threads analysed together, allowed public to see phenomena which constitute our cultural identity and present Polish design in a broader, international context”, said Magda Kochanowska.

DSCF5318 DSCF5300 3+ Furniture designed by Zieta Prozessdesign (POLISH Job Exhibition)5

Above: 3+ Furniture designed by Zieta Prozessdesign

Blue Line_cmielow Design Studio_fot. S.Zimmer(5)

Above: Blue Line_cmielow Design Studio

Clapp Armchair designed by NOTI (Polish Job Exhibition)3

Above: Clapp Armchair designed by NOTI

Florabox designed  by Florabo (Polish Job Exhibition)4

Above: Florabox designed  by Florabo

FSO20.02 Watch designed by Xicorr (Polish Job Exhibition)2

Above: FSO20.02 Watch designed by Xicorr

Hochglance Coal Jewellery designed by Bro.Kat (Polish Job Exhibition)5

Above: Hochglance Coal Jewellery designed by Bro.Kat

My Bath Washtub designed by Beza Projekt (Polish Job Exhibition)

Above: My Bath Washtub designed by Beza Projekt

Patch designed by Beza Projekt (Polish Job Exhibition)

Above: Patch designed by Beza Projekt

Wigry 7 Bicycle designed by Romet Team (Polish Job Exhibition)

Above: Wigry 7 Bicycle designed by Romet Team

Tactilu Bracelet designed by Pan Generator (POLISH Job Exhibition)

Above: Tactilu Bracelet designed by Pan Generator

Bedclothes designed by Sensenia (Polish Job Exhibition)

Above: Bedclothes designed by Sensenia

K2_PAGED_Studio_Rygalik_fot_Jakub_Certowicz_2014

Above: K2_PAGED_Studio_Rygalik

Re-ed Stool designed by AP Dizajn (Polish Job Exhibition)

Above: Re-ed Stool designed by AP Dizajn

 

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